In accordance with City Guidance, masks will be required when visiting all Rev dispensary locations.

Welcome to the 2nd edition of Rev Celebrates Black History Month. Last week, our employees nominated The Weeknd and Darius Rucker as the black artists they felt deserve recognition for their ability to bring people together and embrace each other’s differences. This week’s artists have that same power but with completely contrasting styles.

Bob Marley

One of the most creative and original artists of any era and any genre, Bob Marley is a hero to the Black community and the cannabis community alike. Bob Marley didn’t invent reggae music but he is universally recognized as its greatest ambassador and the driving force behind its global popularity. Released in 1984, three years after his untimely death from skin cancer, Marley’s greatest album Legend is the top-selling reggae album of all time.    

The magic of Marley’s music is that he has a song for virtually every mood. Feeling stressed and anxious? Listen to “Three Little Birds” and you’re practically guaranteed to feel happier.

 

Feeling sad or depressed? 

“Could You Be Loved” is a combination pep talk and party jam that is sure to lift you up and get you going.

Feeling inspired by Black History Month or curious about the events and experiences that have ratcheted up the recent emotions and conversations about racial equality and social justice? “Get Up Stand Up” is an anthem for the unheard, the disadvantaged, and the misunderstood.

A devout believer in the medicinal benefits of cannabis, Bob Marley famously stated: “When you smoke marijuana, it reveals you to yourself. Marley also believed that: “Herb is the healing of the nation, alcohol is the destruction.” Marley is a huge influence on our own Lee Elliott whose Rasta Reviews of our latest strains have become one of the most popular features of our weekly emails.

No matter who you are, where you come from, or what you do for a living, there’s a Bob Marley song that’s sure to bring joy to your day. 

 

Blood Orange

While Bob Marley is a globally recognized icon, Blood Orange has cultivated an energetic fan base on a smaller but intensely passionate scale. Born Devonte Hynes, Blood Orange’s career has included stints in bands and as a writer for other artists including Solange Knowles, Carly Rae Jepsen, and Mariah Carey. His five studio albums showcase his “fluid” music style that defies traditional categorization.

Click on the video below for “You’re Not Good Enough”, close your eyes and you just might think you’re listening to a previously unreleased track from Prince at the height of his funky powers:

Conversely, “Charcoal Baby” is a chill track that’s made for lazy Sunday mornings. You might even think you’re listening to Janet Jackson circa the Velvet Rope era with a visually lush, black-pride centric video to match:  

A great way to introduce yourself to Blood Orange’s music and range is to watch his recent appearance on NPR Music’s Tiny Desk Concert Series. In this acoustic show, Blood Orange seamlessly weaves in and out from soulful crooning to rap and spoken word. It’s easy to understand why he is NYU’s Artist in Residence for the spring semester and why is such a respected speaker in academia.

The employee who nominated Blood Orange also appreciates the fact that “his music is hopeful and deals with getting through trauma, anxiety and depression from the perspective of a queer black person.” Indeed, Blood Orange’s sexuality is as “fluid” as his music which makes him an even greater force for breaking down old stereotypes and fostering a culture of acceptance.

Bob Marley and Blood Orange may be polar opposites in terms of their musical styles and vocal delivery but they are both worthy of slots on your Spotify or Amazon Music playlist. Asking our employees about their favorite black artists has been enlightening for all of us at Revolutionary Clinics and we hope you feel the same way. Check back next Tuesday for our next round of Black artists as we continue our celebration of Black History Month!