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THC might be the best-known element of cannabis, but it’s far from the only ingredient. Although we’re seeing more weed products with higher and higher levels of THC, there are plenty of important components of cannabis to consider when purchasing cannabis. 

Let’s take a look at the complete cannabis picture, and explore some other elements of weed that contribute to great sensations and organic healing.

 

What else besides THC is important in weed?

 

These are the unsung cannabis heroes — the components of weed that give it those euphoric, remedial effects we know and love. Some of these elements are arguably even more important than THC in creating weed’s intended sensations.

 

Cannabinoids

 

These are the metabolites that make up weed. Certainly, the most famous cannabinoids are tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD), but there are at least 113 other cannabinoids that have been discovered in cannabis. 

Rev understands the nuances of cannabinoids, and we test our weed for a variety of them. Some of the other star cannabinoids include: 

 

  • Cannabigerol (CBG). CBG is the parent of all other cannabinoids, meaning THC and CBD were once CBG molecules. CBG doesn’t get you high — in fact, some evidence suggests that CBG works to counteract the effect of THC on the brain. CBG is an important part of weed’s healing properties, playing a major role in pain management and even softening the impact of chronic illnesses like MS.
  • Cannabinol (CBN). This is an element that is often associated with the “degradation” of THC, but it’s still an important part of weed’s overall effect. CBN is created when THC is exposed to air and ultraviolet light, creating a cannabinoid that increases the sedative effects of weed. CBN can be especially helpful in pain management.
  • Tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCv). The effects of THCv are still being researched, and its results are complex. What we do know is that THCv, in high quantities, can create almost the same euphoric effects as THC. However, THCv isn’t psychoactive in low quantities.

 

These cannabinoids often occur in small quantities, much lower than the ratios of THC and CBD to your overall chemical composition. But each and every cannabinoid uniquely contributes to the effects of cannabis. For weed connoisseurs, it’s important to understand the list of total active cannabinoids (TAC) for a complete understanding of your cannabis.

 

Terpenes

 

Terpenes are chemical components that contribute to weed’s aroma. Plenty of other plant-based foods and beverages contain terpenes, which combine to create a unique flavor. Even though terpenes aren’t psychoactive like cannabinoids can be, they still affect how you feel — some terpenes have a more energetic result, while others can make you calm or sleepy. 

For a well-rounded weed education, you’ll need to understand terpenes. Some of the most common terpenes are: 

 

  • Myrcene. The most prevalent terpene in weed, myrcene can also be found in other aromatic plants like mangoes, lemongrass, and hops. Myrcene creates an earthy scent that contributes to weed’s overall flavor, as well as offers anti-inflammatory properties. It’s also theorized that myrcene combines with cannabinoids to create the overall effect of weed. 
  • Beta-caryophyllene. This is the main terpene present in oregano, black pepper, and other herbs. Beta-caryophyllene contributes to the sharp, spicy punch of weed’s aroma. Combined with cannabinoids, beta-caryophyllene can contribute to better gastric function and leverage anti-inflammatory properties. There’s even building evidence that beta-caryophyllene in weed can strengthen your immune system.  
  • Linalool. Linalool — mainly found in lavender plants — is known for its calming effects. Linalool is the reason lavender oil is so therapeutic, and it may also help strengthen the immune system. When present in weed, linalool can contribute to a relaxing aroma. 

 

At Rev, we know about terpenes. To understand the complex effects of your cannabis, terpenes are a great place to start. Finding out what terpenes are prevalent in your weed strain can give you a more nuanced understanding of your cannabis product.

 

Setting and ingestion

 

Cannabis is an adaptogenic substance, meaning where you are and how you ingest it will contribute to the overall effects. If you’re smoking weed in a busy or stressful environment, your experience may be different than a quiet and secluded area. 

In addition to setting, the way in which you ingest weed is a major factor in its intended effect. For instance, using cannabis concentrates may result in more intense sensations than inhaling or vaporizing cannabis flower. Edibles may offer less predictable experiences than inhaling cannabis since your body processes edibles differently depending on what else you’ve consumed.

The most important aspect of the adaptogenic element of cannabis is to shop around. Try different cannabis products and use them in various settings in order to determine which forms, terpenes, and cannabinoids work best for you.

 

Be an informed weed consumer with Rev

 

At Rev, we’re learning new ways to pull together all the important elements in weed — not just THC and CBD. The combined effect of all these molecules is known as the “entourage effect”, in which the different ingredients in weed interact to create an overall impact. 

As a cannabis consumer, knowledge is power. When you’re knowledgeable about the ins and outs of weed composition, you have a better chance at finding the product that does exactly what you want it to do.

Finding the right combination of elements can take some time and experimentation, but Rev is here to help. In our wide selection of cannabis products, we highlight which cannabinoids, terpenes, and other components create the overall entourage effect of your weed. 

The right weed can make a world of difference. Order online today, and schedule a delivery or pickup in one of our Boston area locations!